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Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Psychiatric and Medical Conditions Among Adults with ASD - IACC Presentation by Lisa Croen

From lbrb - Left Brain Right Brain

By Matt Carey
November 20, 2014

The last meeting of the previous Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC) was a workshop on under-recognized co-occurring conditions in ASD. One of the speakers was Lisa Croen of Kaiser Permanente. She spoke about psychiatric and medical conditions among adults with ASD. Much of this work (and more) was presented as a webinar at SFARI. This work was also presented at IMFAR.


If you can find the time to watch the video above (it’s 17 minutes long), it’s well worth it. This is the sort of work we just haven’t seen before now–a look at medical needs of autistic adults. If you don’t have that time, here are a few highlights.

First consider the sort of medical conditions that get a lot of attention in the pediatric population: Sleep, GI and immune. For the pediatric population, one can watch the presentation by the Lewin group that was also given at the IACC workshop:
IACC Co-occurring conditions workshop: Lewin Group presentation on co-occurring conditions in autistic children in the U.S..

In adults, GI, sleep and immune conditions are found more often in the autistic population than in the general population. Moderately more often. Interestingly, thyroid conditions are 2.5 times more common (compare this to GI disorders, which are 1.3 times more common).



By contrast, psychiatric conditions like anxiety, depression and suicide attempts are even more common in the autistic population. Schizophrenia is 22 times more common.


Neurologic conditions are also more common in the autistic population. Parkinson’s is 32 times more common in autistics. Dementia is 4.4 times more common.


This is the sort of work I’ve been calling for since even before I was appointed to the IACC. The autism parent community and the research community spends a lot of time talking about learning about kids and getting tools into the hands of pediatricians. But what about adults?

We know that epilepsy often has an onset about puberty for autistic kids. We know that for another developmental disability, Down Syndrome, early onset dementia is relatively common. But what is going on right now with adults? What is do we, parents and autistics, have to plan around for the future?

If I recall correctly, the last comment I made as a member of the IACC had to do with this study:

"Those are exactly the kind of things that frankly scare the heck out of me and I would like to know more about. And know there’s something on the horizon I need to know about and if there is a way to intervene with adults."

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