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Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Sally Burton-Hoyle’s IACC Presentation: Teen Transition

From lbrb - Left Brain Right Brain

By Matt Carey
December 22, 2014

One member of the previous Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee (and I hope a member of the next IACC) is Sally Burton-Hoyle. Or to be more accurate, Prof. Sally-Burton Hoyle, as she teaches at Eastern Michigan University and holds the title Associate Professor.

In the last full IACC meeting, Prof. Burton-Hoyle gave a presentation on the “Teen Transition”. I apologize that the closed captioning is not present in this video. One can find the video with the closed captioning at the NIH videocast website, here. Click on chapter 14 and you will go straight to her presentation.

She presents on the program to support autistics at Eastern Michigan University. The program seems like an excellent support system for autistics in college.



Sally Burton-Hoyle was a member of the Interagency Autism Coordinating
Committee. In this talk, given in July, 2014, she talks about her work at
Eastern Michigan University in helping autistics transition to college.

All to often, we in the autism communities seem to present our advocacy groups as primarily divided between adult self-advocates and parents of young kids with a very different set of challenges. And by this point in the article I suspect many people have put Prof. Burton-Hoyle in the category of “advocating for adult self-advocates”. And that would be a mistake.

OK, sure, she is doing great work advocating for adults in college, but she is also the sister of an adult autistic who was not a self advocate. An adult who passed away early. And Prof. Burton-Hoyle brought that breadth of experience to the table at the IACC. And in my opinion that breadth of experience and breadth of advocacy is much needed on the IACC.

There is a place for advocates with a more narrow focus, but with so few seats and such a varied autism community we need people on the IACC who will advocate for multiple sub-communities within the broader autism community.

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