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Saturday, July 2, 2016

Encouraging Kindness in Kids

From Greater Good in Action

June 22, 2016

The time required for any of these techniques will vary. Try to use one of them at least once per week.

How to Do It

Avoid using external rewards to reinforce altruistic behavior.

For instance, you may want to think twice before telling kids that they’ll get a special treat if they share their toys, or promising them extra TV time if they help clean up after dinner. As tempting as it may be to reward kids when they do something kind, that approach can backfire: They may learn that kindness is only worth performing when they’ll be given some kind of prize as a result.

Instead, kids should get to experience the feeling that kindness is its own reward—a view backed up by neuroscience studies showing that pleasure centers of the brain light up when people behave altruistically.

Praise character, not behavior.

Research suggests that children are more likely to make kindness a habit if they are praised for being kind people rather than just for doing something kind. For example, saying, “You’re such a helpful person” may be more effective than saying, “That was such a helpful thing to do.”

Praising their character encourages children to see kindness as an essential part of who they are and seems to be especially effective around age eight, when children are forming their moral identities.

But criticize behavior, not character.

In other words, it’s OK to induce guilt, but not shame. Children who feel guilt (“I did a bad thing”) after wrongdoing are more likely to feel remorse and make amends than those who feel shame (“I am a bad person”).

Criticizing a behavior conveys that it’s possible for the child to change his or her behavior and make better choices in the future. Such criticism may be especially effective when it also includes positive affirmation (e.g., “You’re a good person, and I know you can do better.”)

Model altruistic behavior.

Ultimately, actions speak louder than words when it comes to cultivating altruism. Research shows that when children witness adults behaving altruistically, they are more likely to behave altruistically themselves, regardless of what the adults say to them about the importance of altruism.

1 comment:

  1. As a parent, it is our duty to provide some basic learning about different categories to our kids. So that, they can easily refine their thoughts and personality. We can put good things in our kid's mind, as due to the early age they can easily catch the complete things properly and implement in their lifestyle. I would like to follow the ingredients present here regarding learning strategies and how to improve our kids' mentality.
    Learning Tips

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