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Thursday, April 12, 2018

New Report Shows School Funding Gaps Based on Race and Poverty

From the Education Law Prof Blog

By Derek Black
April 2, 2018

Ed Trust has released a 2018 update of Funding Gaps. It finds:
  • School districts serving the largest populations of Black, Latino, or American Indian students receive roughly $1,800, or 13 percent, less per student in state and local funding than those serving the fewest students of color. This may seem like an insignificant amount, but it adds up. For a school district with 5,000 students, a gap of $1,800 per student means a shortage of $9 million per year.
  • For school districts serving the largest populations of students from low income families, the gap is smaller but no less significant. Across the country, the U.S. spends approximately 7 percent — or $1,000 — less per pupil on students educated in our nation’s highest poverty districts than those educated in the wealthiest. Again for a school district with 5,000 students, this totals to a $5 million short changing for students who already have less.

This chart provides an overall snapshot of whether states are making good faith efforts to fund the education needs of low-income students. Those states in red are those that spend less than necessary to fund the basic education needs of low-income students.


Kirabo Jackson's recent studies, of course, show that these sorts of funding gaps account for a substantial portion of the achievement gap between students.

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